Each year, almost half a million babies and children become ill with tuberculosis (TB) and as many as 70,000 are estimated to die because of the disease. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), children under 3 years of age and those with severe malnutrition or weakened immune systems are at greatest risk for developing TB.

 
Dr. Raul V. Destura, Director of the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology of the National Institutes of Health


“Research gaps are unmet needs in your research. You have to identify what is really needed in the field and have an open mind,” explained Dr. Raul V. Destura, Director of the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology of the National Institutes of Health (IMBB-NIH) in a lecture organized by the Philippine Council for Health Research and Development (PCHRD) last March 01, 2012.

“There are gaps in infectious diseases research that need to be identified and addressed, especially in these three diseases – dengue, tuberculosis and influenza,” said Dr. Destura.

Senate Health and Demography Committee Chair Senator Pia Cayetano appealed to the Aquino administration to intensify childhood cancer programs in the country.

“Cancer kills more people than malaria, tuberculosis and AIDS combined. It is the leading cause of death among children 5-14 years old. These children die not because of

“Basta magtulungan mabubuhay at maililigtas and mga batang may kanser sa Pilipinas! [As long as we help one another we can save the lives of children afflicted with cancer in the Philippines],” said Senate Health and Demography Committee Chair Senator Pia Cayetano.

Childhood cancer, like any other cancer, undergoes the typical disease process – cells grow uncontrollably developing into abnormal sizes and shapes, destroying neighboring cells and eventually spreading to other organs and tissues.